Sunday, January 03, 2010

The new icon.

For many years now I've been thinking of what sort of an icon I should have for my site and my blog. At first I didn't want ANY graphics, because they slowed the pages down and made the html coding more complex, but that was more than a decade ago, speeds are now excellent, and modern web tools such as blogs and wikis make that optimization unnecessary.

I thought of an upside down Statue Of Liberty, but people might get confused about who is inverting the idea of liberty, me or libertarians.

So instead, I've simply put the 4 most iconic libertarians together under a red circle and slash (meaning "no".) Rand, Hayek, Nozick, and Milton Friedman. I suppose people could argue for others such as Rothbard, Paul, Mises, etc., but let's not make things complicated: each represents a rather different major strand of libertarianism. It's good enough.

If anybody wants to propose a better icon, I welcome submissions.

9 comments:

W6NZX said...

If I had the artistic ability I'd say a parody of the Libertarian Party logo, but with the statue of liberty Laughing hysterically at the "lights" of Libertarian thought you've already pictured at her feet with them drawn as children throwing a tantrum.

-R

ClayBarham said...

Is it self-centered greed or legitimate self-interest that concerns most about Ayn Rand? Many who admire and criticize Ayn Rand’s beliefs about people standing on their own feet say she promoted selfishness, thereby greed, which is self-centered and anti-individual creativity. That is not Ayn Rand. She admired creative individuals like railroad builder James Jerome Hill, on whom she was reputed to have based her character Nathaniel Taggart in Atlas Shrugged. Independent “I’m OK, you’re OK” people are OK with Rand, not thieves and takers. Howard Roark’s summation to the jury, from Fountainhead, does not show a self-centered individual destroying his work. If greedy he would simply accept his payment. Roark was an other- and outer-centered individual in love with his own dreams and creations, as one would love a spouse, child or family and refuse to allow them to be assaulted. That is the self-interest that built America. Though love for anything more important than self is not inconsistent with Christianity. Claysamerica.com.

jjensenii said...

@ClayBarham:

I haven't read Rand's fiction, but it's important to note that that even if her fiction were faultless, the philosophy she explicitly endorsed in her non-fiction is muddled and at times downright sickening in its misanthropy, and non-Randian libertarians, including some heterodox Objectivists, will tell you this.

mikeyaustudent said...

Clay, JJ Hill was not above accepting government handouts to build railways. He was deeply involved in the creation of the CPR, which recieved all kinds of government money and land so that they could build and operate their
road.

mikeyaustudent said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
PT-12599 said...

Mike, I don't think the "ban" symbol is the way to go, as it implies "forbidden" or "prohibited".

Something milder or more irreverent like putting on clown noses/dunce caps/etc. is more in keeping with the "critiquing" theme of this blog.

mikeyaustudent said...

This image, I feel, best symbolizes
the triumph of government over markets.
http://blogs.lctmag.com/images/blogs_lctmag_com/limolicious/Trabant%20travesty.jpg

Joanna said...

Yes, let's not make things complicated, let's leave out the only coherent libertarian economics of Mises and Rothbard. Let's focus on cult leader Rand, irrational Hayek, equivocal Nozick and central bank guy Milton Friedman instead, so much easier to criticize...

zhu said...

"She admired" a psychopathic kidnapper and murderer of a small child. 'Nuff said.